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Author Topic: Royal Navy 1920-30s  (Read 2466 times)

Keivan

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Royal Navy 1920-30s
« on: 02 February 2015 09:25:10 PM »

Hi all,
I need to research about the traditions on board RN ships during 1920s-30s, what sort of mixed drinks (alcoholic and non) the crew used to prepare and imbibe, as well as herbal remedies used to fight various illnesses, or preservation methods for food and drinks during long voyages. Something about the most common routes at that time and what edible goods were transported from/into them.
Any help or info about it would be really appreciated, if anyone can point me in the right direction.
many thanks
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PhiloNauticus

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Re: Royal Navy 1920-30s
« Reply #1 on: 03 February 2015 10:05:34 AM »

Mixed drinks?  The only alcohol the ship's company was allowed was the daily issue of grog, apart from that, it was the usual tea!  Lime juice ('limers') was still issued to those under age.  'Kai' was a favourite drink for the cold weather/night watches.(Kai - drinking chocolate made from melted cooking chocolate, with a good dollop of evaporated milk)
   Only officers had access to a bar in the wardroom: I would think that their tastes would echo the current fashions - I believe gin-based drinks (horses necks etc.) were popular.
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PhiloNauticus

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Re: Royal Navy 1920-30s
« Reply #2 on: 04 February 2015 03:46:10 PM »

Herbal remedies?? not aware of anything like this

Food preservation? - normal for the time, i.e. a mix of fresh food, with tinned and dried foods; fridges & freezers introduced during the 1930s and ships above destroyer in size had a bakery as well as a galley

A destroyer in the 1930s carried 13 weeks supply of food, which included: flour; oatmeal; biscuit; preserved meat; rice; haricot beans; marrowfat peas; split peas; raisins & currants; sugar; fish; suet; tea & coffee apart from fresh goods (vegetables & meat) for which they carried two weeks supply.  A destroyer in 1940 would carry 22.5 tons of food - by 1945 this had risen to 33 tons

Common routes...  edible goods? not understood..
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