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Author Topic: HM LCI (L) 99  (Read 5044 times)

Mark B.

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HM LCI (L) 99
« on: 03 May 2024 08:33:37 pm »

Hi all

I'm just starting out on researching my friends father's Naval Service.

She has a small notebook with a few scant notes in it, but it is clear he was on LCI(L) 99 from build until sometime in 1944 (possibly June).

Can anyone help with any information about where it was operational and what landings it took part in?


Are there any photos of the 99 out there?
I am aware that the 99 was sunk in August 44 and wonder how many of the men lost on that day he knew.

Would love to be in contact with any relatives of the crew and hopefully assist each other in filling in gaps in our knowledge.

Many thanks

Mark
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PhiloNauticus

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Re: HM LCI (L) 99
« Reply #1 on: 04 May 2024 11:11:34 am »

LCI(L) 99 has already featured in this forum, albeit a while ago
The ship was deployed to the Mediterranean and took part in the landings on Sicily 20 July 1943 (Operation Husky) and also the landings at Anzio 22 January 1944 (Operation Shingle)
[source: British Invasion Fleets by John Winser]

Did not take part in the Normandy landings, but was part of the follow-up support, taking supplies from Barry, South Wales, to Seine Bay for the landing beaches.   It was whilst on this duty that she was lost

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Mark B.

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Re: HM LCI (L) 99
« Reply #2 on: 14 May 2024 07:13:17 pm »

Thanks for the prompt reply and information.
The landings at Sicily and Anzio tie in with his list of places "visited?".

Pantelleria and Salerno are also listed in capital letters. Do you think it would be worth me looking at the Green lists to track LCI(L) 99's service.

I was until a few weeks ago totally ignorant about these lists, but I am disappointed, on the veterans behalf, that so little is known about these vessels and their service.

Thanks in anticipation of any more information.

Mark
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Hammerhead

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Re: HM LCI (L) 99
« Reply #3 on: 11 June 2024 09:51:09 am »

Hi,

My Great Uncle Arthur Reynolds was commanding LCI(l) 99 when she was sunk in the Bristol Channel. There are a few bits of family lore (so take with something of a pinch of salt) about this that I could pass on.
Firstly it was very difficult for the rest of the family to actually find out what had happened to the ship as the records appeared to be under some sort of restriction for years after the war, the theory is that U-Boats were not expected to to be operating that close to the mainland and that far up the Bristol Channel.

Secondly is that it was running only a skeleton crew of 9 as it had been undergoing repairs and the trip with the convoy was destined for Falmouth where she would begin operations ferrying material across to Normandy. The requirement for repairs was why she did not take part in the initial landings. As there was a gap in service the married crew were allowed shore leave, with the understanding that they would re-join at Falmouth. The account of the sinking from the US Navy ship in the convoy mentions picking up survivors but our understanding is that all hands aboard were lost.

Lastly, my grandfather always told a story of how, whilst they did take part in the landings on Sicily, his brother at the first attempt managed to land at the wrong beach at a village where there was no enemy, had a quick walk around, got back on board and re-joined the rest of the fleet!

The 9 crew that lost their lives.

House, Gordon Henry Astor,               RN   21   Leading Seaman   
Jeffries, Ronald,                                RN   23   Ordinary Telegraphist   
Quine, James,                                   RN   21   Able Seaman   
Reynolds, Arthur John Francis Patrick, RN   24   Lieutenant   
Shacklock, Francis Ernest Dennis,       RN   19   Able Seaman   
Shields, John,                                   RN      Ordinary Seaman   
Swatridge, Douglas Edwin,                 RNVR   25   Sub-Lieutenant   
Thompson, Donald Maurice,               RN   20   Ordinary Seaman   
Todd, William,                                   RN   19   Able Seaman

I initially thought that they were all recorded on the Portsmouth RN Memorial but it seems not, some are at Chatham and some at Plymouth, why would this be?


Andrew.
« Last Edit: 11 June 2024 10:40:09 am by Hammerhead »
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PhiloNauticus

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Re: HM LCI (L) 99
« Reply #4 on: 11 June 2024 12:08:17 pm »


There were survivors I believe, HMS Londonderry, one of the escorts to the small convoy picked up people I think.

See if you can get sight of the report in the National Archives =

  https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C16381413

The reason for names being on different memorials is probably to do with where their 'home port' was - back in the day, ratings were based at one of the main naval ports as their 'home' port

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Hammerhead

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Re: HM LCI (L) 99
« Reply #5 on: 11 June 2024 01:29:32 pm »

From British Warship Losses in the Modern era.

14 August LCI (L) 99 landing craft, infantry, large Orange 1942; 380 tons; 150ft x 23.8ft; 4 x 20mm Lieutenant Arthur John Reynolds RNVR
Part of Convoy EBC72, which was bound for Falmouth from Milford Haven, and consisting of two columns of American and British amphibious craft escorted by the Londonderry and Azalea. At 16.54, then being in position 50.56N 04.47W, an American landing ship, LST 921, was hit by a torpedo, with a large amount of water and debris being thrown into the air and 2 minutes later, another torpedo hit LCI 99 amidships. The craft immediately broke up and started to sink. The Londonderry went to the scene and lowered boats to pick up survivors before carrying out an Asdic search. A depth-charge and Hedgehog attack was carried out on a suspected contact, but without result. The attacker had been U 667 (Lange). Nine men were lost. [TNA:ADM.358/4381]
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Mark B.

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Re: HM LCI (L) 99
« Reply #6 on: 13 June 2024 08:47:08 am »

Andrew, thankyou for posting this information about your Great Uncle.

My friend's Father served under him for the whole of his time onboard. The information you have posted has already answered some of the many questions i have.

I have sent you a PM.

PhiloNauticus, again thank you for your really helpful input.

Mark
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